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My Definition of Professional

I was considering writing an article about my background and experience to let people get to know me better. My thinking was that it would let potential clients get to know me better.

I was a little worried that anyone mentioned in my story might recognise themselves and disagree with my interpretation of events or their influence on me. Since everyone remembers things differently, this is practically inevitable.

However, something happened earlier this week that illustrates my personal philosophy far better than my life story, and won’t ruffle any feathers (or at least none that I personally care about).

I went to check out a couple of places for rent in the area. Both are in an area of town with a less than wholesome reputation, but rumours can sometimes be unfounded, so I wanted to take a look for myself. It also occurred to me that somewhere that does have a reputation might be more willing to risk taking on a self-employed tennant. 

I had arranged with the owner to look at two properties that were available. I arrived on time and had to wait in the rain for someone to show up. When someone did show up, he unlocked the first property and immediately went upstairs. I thought this was strange, but I followed him up. He told me he had things to do and left, so I started looking around upstairs first. You can see what I found in the video below.

A tour of the first house I viewed.

After viewing this house, I messaged the owner to let them know I was ready to view the other property, which I was told was twice as big, and also to ask when the house I’d already looked at would be finished. Not wanting to waste a perfect opportunity, I also mentioned that I could help them get it ready. They didn’t get back to me right away, so I hung out in The Hub while I waited.

They did get back to me though and I was able to go back later and see the second property. The property-manager/ handy-man had been told what I had said and was clearly under the impression that there was nothing wrong with the first house. So we went back and I showed him the bumps in the carpet, the missing floor tiles, the unfinished downstairs bathroom, damage to the kitchen cupboards (I don’t think you can see it in the video, but the door of the cupboard with the glasses in looked like something had chewed the bottom corner of it), and the mold.

He said that the place would be rented as it is. He also let it be known that there would be no work there for me. He said that they only hired professional contractors. Perhaps I shouldn’t have, but I told him that I didn’t think they’d done a good enough job. I suspect he’d done most, if not all of it, himself.

The second property was much nicer, brighter, cleaner, larger. In fact the only thing I saw wrong with it was that there were large tears in the carpets. They would have been easily covered with furniture, but I mentioned it to the property manager and asked if it would be replaced. He said no. After asking about the paint-tubs and scraps of wood in otherwise nice looking kitchen, I got a very evasive answer, as if he was telling me (a prospective tenant) that it was none of my business,

Suffice to say, even though the second property was nice, I never want to have to rely on that man to fix anything for me. Particularly since he doesn’t seem to like me much for saying that the first house wasn’t ready to be lived in.

Let’s get back to the comment he made about professional contractors. The whole line of questioning leading up to his declaration that they only hire professionals (Are you a professional? Are you a qualified tradesman?) was meant to imply that I lack the credentials to comment on or evaluate the work that had been done. As if the fact that I haven’t been to trade school disqualifies me from having standards.

I freely admit that the level of service I provide, at a very affordable rate, is that of an enthusiastic amateur. My experience with DIY has come from helping my Dad (a former plumber who also wired every socket in our old house and made a built-in vivarium for our pet reptiles) and Grandad (a joiner by trade and avid gardener) with various projects, including carpet fitting, wallpapering and plastering, and also from doing all the DIY in my own home when I lived in America.

For me, being professional is a state of mind. An attitude toward the work and your clients. It means showing up early whenever possible, getting on with the tasks requested of me as quickly and efficiently as possible, not slacking off (I give myself breaks between jobs anyway), and doing the best job I can. If I find that a job is beyond me, I get help. I’m getting to know quite a few handy-folk, many of which specialise at something I’m not so good at.

Being professional, as far as I’m concerned, means being helpful, courteous, friendly, approachable, kind and willing to go above-and-beyond to make the client happy. Yes, I don’t have a certificate that qualifies me to do odd-jobs. What I do have though is a growing number of clients that are so happy with my work that they recommend me to their friends. I even got a couple of Christmas cards and gifts.

I also think a professional should be able to listen to negative comments about their work and use that feedback to do a better job in future. The more I learn, the better I can get, and I often learn a lot more from my mistakes than I do from my successes. I don’t get in my own way.

I’m also trying very hard not to be petty or vengeful, since that would be very unprofessional of me, so I hope this post doesn’t come across as such. I admit that I am venting a little. I admit that this got under my skin a little. Hopefully, I’ve made my point without being a jerk.

Merry Christmas everyone. Have a great day.

The Viking

I’ve been wondering lately if I should get back into writing. When I saw that Facebook was piloting subscription groups, I even thought about resurrection the old ‘Creative Writers’ group from the dead. If I could collect a small subscription fee from each member it would help make up for the time and effort I would put into running the group. However, I don’t really have the time.

I had another idea. A way to get back into writing without taking time and focus away from the odd-job business. Tool and equipment reviews! Ideally I’d be using a wearable camera to record a first-person view as I’m working. For right now, I’ll have to make do with using my phone.ย 

Also, I have a new logo!

I’m going to talk to businesses, most likely starting with the local Builders Merchant, Travis Perkins,ย and ask them if they have any tools they’d like me to review. Perhaps even tell them what jobs I’ve got coming up so we can pick products that would fit with what I’m doing. Even if they don’t offer to pay me from their marketing budget, having some free tools to use in exchange for a review would certainly help my bottom line.

First, I think I need to write a few sample reviews, based on equipment I get to use already, so they can see exactly what I have to offer. Hopefully you can help me get my readership numbers up by sharing this and subsequent review articles to anyone and everyone you think might be interested. Don’t just spam everyone. That’s just annoying. Be selective ๐Ÿ™‚

So here comes my first ever non-geeky review article ever (unless you geek out about garden equipment). It’ll be shorter than future ones, since I’ve already blathered on for quite some time now just introducing you to the idea.

The Viking!

Today I got to use a Viking GE 355 wood chipper. I first tried using it in the summer to get rid of some hedge trimmings, but I hadn’t been able to figure out how to turn it on. No amount of poking the switch was working. It had been sitting in the client’s garage for quite some time and I was worried that it was in need of repair. I put it back in the garage until I could get around to tinkering with it.

Thankfully, it was only the well-used extension cord that was faulty. I plugged it in directly to the electric socket and it worked right away. There was quite a pile of garden waste built up over the summer. A lot of it had been burned, but it’s been too damp lately to get the fire to catch, so I thought I would give the Viking a try to get rid of the rest, making use of a new power extension lead.

I discovered that it dealt with the smaller twigs and sticks with no problem, but it got choked up and stopped if it was over-filled. Particularly if there was anything over an inch thick being fed through along with the lighter stuff. Luckily the two black knobs at the top of the base are bolts that allow you to easily remove the feed hopper from the base and get to the blade. Making clearing any bits of wood that are jamming up the works super easy.

I’d highly recommend making sure the blades spin freely before you put it all back together. It’s a little frustrating to think you’ve cleared the blockage, only to have the motor stall again. You can’t test the motor before you put it back together. The blades won’t turn without the bolts screwed back in. A good safety feature really, but having to take it apart again because you weren’t thorough is annoying.ย 

All in all it’s a good bit of kit. It will even chew up the thicker pieces if you don’t put anything else in with it, and just let it chew. I have trouble maintaining the patience for this. It’s really helpful that you can open it up so easily. ๐Ÿ™‚ย 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIR3JD6CkIM

Business to Business

When I first moved to Kidwelly, I tried to get a job with one of the local businesses. One of these businesses even gave me a trial shift. I didn’t hear back from them, until yesterday. It’s been months, but I guess with Christmas around the corner they’re looking to hire some extra hands.

This reminded me of an idea I’d considered a while back. Offering my extensive experience to businesses as well as private individuals. My workload is full at the moment, but with winter coming, and gardening work becoming unnecessary, I expect I’ll be needing other kinds of work to maintain a steady income.

I’ve been doing painting jobs, assembling furniture, etc. which has been great, but projects like that end. Once the walls are painted, the new furniture assembled, the curtains hung, the carpet laid, the cracks filled, or whatever other work I’ve been asked to do is done, there’s nothing else to do but hope they find more work for me.

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I’ve already begun making contacts among the local rental property owners and done some work for them. I’ve done handyman work for other local businesses too, gardening. I’d be more than happy to do more of the same, but it never hurts to have more to offer. I am, after all, a true jack of all trades. It would be a shame to leave some of my skills untapped.

So here’s my thinking. Local businesses can hire Odd-Job Antony, just like they might hire a plumber or an electrician, to do a job for them. This might be to cover for an absent employee, or to help with the Christmas rush, or even to do some handyman work. Either way they don’t have to employ me permanently, or even put me on the payroll. I’m a contractor, not an employee.

Here’s what I can do. Even before I got my first job in retail, I was raised to believe that a little good customer service can go a long way. I wanted to be even better, so I studied interpersonal skills, body language, and sales techniques. This served me well as I tried my hand at telesales as well as face-to-face sales positions, bar work, and even a supervisor role at a laser-tag arena.

I ended up back in retail again when I moved to America. I also got my first opportunity to work in a kitchen. It was just a McDonald’s, but it was a start. I got back into sales after that, and found I was good at over-the-phone debt collection. I only quit that job because I had to move. I found out I wasn’t so good at car sales. At least, not then. I’m a little curious if I could now with all I’ve learned since.

I started looking for other ways to make money. Particularly after I got a taste of management and corporate-ladder climbing. I started reading about self-improvement, leadership, entrepreneurship, and marketing. It got me a promotion to the marketing department of the communications company I was working for at the time. It gave me the opportunity to see how demographic data was used to increase sales, and even train people how to sell.

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I learned so much about business and management that I want to try starting my own business. I once spent a whole evening finding names and contact info for 200 people with the intention of inviting them to a tarot reading provided by my ex-wife, but she wasn’t comfortable with the idea of cold-calling strangers. In hindsight she was probably right, but it was kinda fun gathering all the information.

If you want I can tell you more about that little business venture, but it will have to be in person, or a least a private message. I started writing and blogging after that, inspired by the books I was reading. Hoping that the key to building wealth was writing. When I came back home to the UK I went back to working in bars and hotels. Until I moved to Kidwelly.

I found it hard to generate an income from writing and blogging, even using every social media marketing trick I learned. Local jobs were hard to come by, but I applied for every one that popped up. None of them panned out. I noticed though that lots of people were asking for help on the Kidwelly Noticeboard groups on Facebook. I realised there was a need that I could fill, and that’s why I started Odd-Job Antony.

To summarise. I’m a customer service and sales expert experienced in bar-work, retail, hospitality, entertainment, marketing, blogging and entrepreneurship, as well as being handy with a paintbrush, trowel, saw, hammer or screwdriver. In fact, if you can find something I can’t do, I’ll knock ยฃ10 off the next job. That’s a free hour doing anything you want. You could even use that hour to train me up if yo like. Want to try me?

Stairway to…?

This post is mostly going to be a pic dump showing the progress/process of painting a client’s staircase.ย  It was a fun project, and a little different from the way I normally work. Instead of charging by the hour, I was asked to provide a quote for the materials and labour. Which I did, and they were happy with my quote! ๐Ÿ™‚

Technically my client was the landlord, rather than the home’s resident, though I’ve worked with the resident before to mow her lawn and do some other bits and bobs. She and I had already figured out how she wanted the staircase to look, and the landlord was happy to let us be creative.

20181010_110901The first thing I had to do was fill the gaps in the wood. The workmen that put the new stairs in used the original banister rails, and they weren’t quite compatible.20181010_110924There were also some MDF pieces, that weren’t quite flush with the pine steps. More filler to the rescue! We would definitely need to use paint here.20181010_110938Then we started masking off the parts that we didn’t want to paint. The majority of the step would be stained later.20181010_124822I used both ‘Frogtape’ masking tape and masking film to prevent as much splatter-related mistakes as possible before I started applying the white paint.20181010_14084320181010_14084920181010_15390920181010_15392220181011_115610When the white parts were all done, I started adding the violet details! Once again I masked off as best as I could.20181012_10282020181012_102826Then took the frogtape off again afterwards to make sure it looked right.20181012_10331820181012_103321Sometimes there was a little bit of ‘bleeding’ despite my best efforts. Where I could I cleaned up these edge afterward with white paint and a small brush.20181012_112312Before we could start staining the new wood, I would have to clean up the dirty paw prints and spills. Some sandpaper took of the surface dirt without having to get the wood wet.20181012_11423520181012_11424120181012_11461220181012_114616After they were dirt free again, then I applied the woodstain. A nice warm yellow tone to compliment the violet.20181012_17343620181017_104258[1]After a couple of coats of varnish to keep the wood looking nice and make future cleanup easier, it was time for final touch-ups and the tile-effect stickers on the risers. They were easier to keep bubble-free than I expected!20181017_114756[1]20181017_114802[1]I was pretty pleased with the finished staircase, and the resident was overjoyed! ๐Ÿ™‚

Technically there are still some carpet pads to put on there, and the resident would also like to put mirrored mosaic tiles on the violet not-quite-triangles, but the work I was commissioned for is all done. ๐Ÿ™‚

I really enjoyed doing this. Hopefully I’ll have more DIY, painting and creative projects to keep me occupied as the gardening work drops off.

Would you like to see more posts like this? Please let me know what you think in the comments.

Have a great day ๐Ÿ™‚

 

Time to Commit

I think it’s time to take the stories down. I need to make this website all about the handyman work. The fiction distracts and detracts from the new direction I’ve taken. So, to that end, I’ll be taking it all down. From now on every page will be related to the Odd-Job business. I won’t take down the old blog posts, they show my journey if anyone is interested, but future blog posts will mostly be about how the business is doing.

It won’t all be business. Sometimes I just want to write about something that’s on my mind. I’ll try to avoid anything controversial, but hopefully these random musings will get people to know me better as a person. I’m a firm believer that people tend to work with people they like. You could be the most talented, experienced and professional handyman in the area, but if people don’t like you they won’t hire you again.

I don’t put on a show though. Part of the reason I prefer working for myself instead of any other job I’ve ever had, is that I can just be myself. I don’t need to conform to what some manager with no trainingย thinks the customer wants. Don’t get me wrong, I’m very nice to people, but not because I’m being told to. I’m nice because I like to be nice. It feels good to smile. It feels even better to make others smile.

I won’t tell you I can do something if I don’t think I can or I’ve never tried. I will tell you up front if I have no access to the resources necessary for the job. If I haven’t done something before, but I have a good idea how to do it and I’d like to give it a shot, I’ll tell you that too. I prefer honesty to making promises I can’t deliver on. I do like doing new things though. It’s how I get more experienced, after all. Plus, it’s way more fun doing something new than doing the same boring old things all the time!

Things I really can’t do at the moment includes anything that involves driving anywhere or transporting stuff (I don’t have a van yet), going up to a second storey on a ladder (I really don’t want to die or be severely injured for ยฃ10 per hour), or raise an army of the dead (I could never find any decent necromancy classes). I’ll try my hand at almost anything else, but please bear in mind that I’m an enthusiastic and helpful amateur, and not a tradesman of any kind. Most of my experience before I started has been from helping out friends and family, and maintaining my own house and garden when I lived in the US.

I’ve been doing a lot of gardening for people, including mowing lawns, strimming, pruning, weeding, trimming, planting, and even burning the garden waste. That season is drawing to a close though. Luckily I’m also getting a lot more DIY jobs like hanging shelves and curtain rails, painting fences, sheds and staircases, building furniture (from flat pack and from scratch), disassembling furniture carefully for re-assembly elsewhere, and I’ve also helped clear out a junk room and walked dogs (though that’s not really DIY).

I’d love to get more jobs that involve making something. It could be anything from helping to make toys and clothing (did I mention I can sew?) to a new partition wall in your house. Anything I don’t know how to do, I can learn. If the client knows how something is done, and just needs an extra pair of hands to do it, I’ll be happy to learn from them. If not I can do the research and get back to them. I’ll show them what I plan to do, making certain it matches their vision and figuring out together what needs to be changed.

Since my overheads are low (I’m living with my parents rent free and I don’t have a vehicle to maintain), and I’m not a certified tradesman, I can keeps my rates low too, though I do appreciate it when a client feels that my work and my time is worth a bit more. One client that did so without any prompting from me said, ‘If I pay you a decent wage then you’ll keep coming back to me’. He’s absolutely right. If I have a scheduling conflict and I have to chose between client that only pays my base rate and him, I’m going to pick him!

It’s getting so I’m busy every week now, which is great. With luck and kindness, I’ll be able to start saving up for my own place, or a cheap vehicle, soon. It’s been slow going at the moment while I invest in more tools for the business, work clothes, bus travel (I have a client I visit twice a week that lives out of town), but I’m trying to cut back on these expenses so that I can begin making some real head way.

I’ll keep you up to date on my progress when I can. I’ve been so busy that writing this post has taken over a week to write! To be fair, it’s not just the Odd-Job business. I’ve also got a Games & Geekery club started in Kidwelly that’s branched into Family Games Day and a Warhammer group too, plus there’s my personal life. I won’t talk about that here though. Local geeks and gamers are welcome to join the Facebook Group. I also have a WordPress site for anyone to enjoy.

If you want to know the more personal stuff, you’ll have to know me better ๐Ÿ˜‰

I’d best wrap this up and get this out, or it’ll be another week before I do. Before I go though, I have a few easy questions. Just to see if you’ve been paying attention.

  1. What’s my basic hourly rate for any odd-job work?
  2. What did I think I could make a career out of before I started Odd-Jobbing?
  3. What else have I been up to in the community that’s been keeping me busy?
  4. Why are my rates so low?

Can you find all the answers? (Hint: they’re in bold!)

Thanks for following, and have a great day! ๐Ÿ™‚

 

A Client Read My Blog!

I definitely need to take the time to finish updating this blog. I actually had a client ask me about the book I was working on. I had to tell her that there is no book anymore, at least not at the moment. Doing odd-jobs is working out well for me, and so my writing career is on hold. At least for now.

I didn’t make this decision lightly. I really thought that telling stories for a living was going to be my calling, so I did my research to find out what it would take to be successful at it. I’ve always learned best by doing, so I got writing. I also tried out some of the tricks I’d learned about social media marketing and ran a pretty successful writer’s group on Facebook for a while.

In the process I figured out how to self-publish and learned a lot from fellow writers. I also got to see first hand how much work actually goes into writing a book, and how little readers appreciate it. Writing is a more than full time job. Especially as an indie writer. You need to keep writing, every day, and you need to promote yourself and build an audience.

What this really means is that you spend all day, everyday shut in your office (which in my case is an old card table I put my laptop on in the spare room of my parent’s house, aka my bedroom). It gets lonely and depressing, especially when you and every other writer you talk to can’t seem to actually make any headway.

There are some writers I’ve talked to that have cracked the code and manage to produce enough writing to make a more than healthy living. They do so by studying market trends to see what sells well, and writing to market. They are able to churn out a daily quota of writing because they follow a plan that conforms to their audience’s expectations.

Sadly, this isn’t the kind of writing I want to do. I want to write the stories I have in my head. It’s possible that I could get to eventually if I write what the people want for a while, but my heart just isn’t in it. I can’t do it. It just sucks all the joy out of writing. I thought maybe I could freelance to make money instead of compromising myself, and found that freelancing as ghost-writer and article writer is just as hard to break into as creative writing.

I then thought that perhaps I could try taking a part time job to bring in some cash that way, but found that finding a job in the small town of Kidwelly was almost impossible, and commuting to the next big town over was problematic. I don’t have a car as yet (because it requires money and a UK license) and so I have to use public transport. The last bus from Carmarthen to Kidwelly is at 6pm, and most employers want you to work past that time.

Out of desperation, frustration and impatience, I decided to offer my services as an Odd-Job guy locally. I knew there were plenty of people living here that could use an extra hand or two from time-to-time. I’ve missed the gardening, DIY and small home repairs I used to do when I had a house, and this seemed like it would give me an outlet for the skills I’ve learned, make me a bit of money, and help people out.

It turned out to be so much more than that! It gets me out of the house, gets me using my body instead of wasting its potential at a desk, it allowed me to meet people in the Kidwelly community and hear their own stories, it makes me feel good to do a good job for the clients and see my progress, and I even have other people interested in working with me. It’s a lot of fun.

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The new Facebook Page pic!

That last part, about the work being fun, is the biggest surprise. I always thought I was too dorky, too wimpy, to be able to do a physical job (I also thought that conforming to a sexist sterotype was inherently sexist). Admittedly, it was a lot harder when I started. My body just wasn’t used to working up a sweat. Now though, I’m disappointed if I don’t get do do at least four to five hours a day of fighting brambles, sawing wood, or hefting something heavy from one place to another!

It’s so fulfilling I feed no need to write fiction. My real life is better. I’ve expressed this sentiment before, but it’s true. I still run my two rp groups, but they’re more of a social game than actual story writing, particularly since it’s just for fun, not profit. I might write some non-fiction later, and maybe some fiction too, but for now I’m happy to let the business grow, and help it along. I’ll go back to writing books when I don’t need the money.

I won’t be able to do physical work forever, it’s bound to take a toll on my body, but for now the aches and pains I have at the end of the day are tangible evidence of a job well done, and it feels good. I feel like I’ve achieved something instead of just waiting for something good to happen.

No more pushing myself to write something and worrying that it’s statistically unlikely to sell a single copy. This is a far more effective and sustainable business model. The next step is to get my bodycam working so I can make videos of what I’m doing that I can then post on YouTube. I’m also working on getting a UK driver’s license so that I can try to get a van. Luckily there’s a guy interested in joining our little Odd-Job Squad that has is an experienced truck driver and is thinking of getting a van too, so I might be able to do bigger jobs earlier than expected! ๐Ÿ™‚

I’m really happy, and I never thought it would come from this.

Have a great day. ๐Ÿ™‚

 

 

 

What Happened to the Website?

I changed it! Do you like it? Don’t worry, I’m still going to write (in fact I may actually write more frequently), I’ll just be doing it for fun, instead of trying to make a living at it. My main source of income (for now) is performing random tasks, odd-jobs, chores, and bits and bobs!

Most of what I’m doing is gardening. Mowing lawns, ripping up weeds, pruning, strimming, hedge-trimming, planting, etc. Occasionally I get to assemble and hang shelving units, curtains rails and pictures, or to clean up and repaint garden furniture or a fence. I’ve also poured concrete, cleared gutters, shovelled gravel and even helped people to access their emails more easily.

I’m looking forward to some bigger challenges. I have one client that would like to extend their decking. Another has an old wood-frame greenhouse they would like to have repaired (removing the rotten wood and splicing in new, fresh timbers). One of my newer clients has some cracks on the outside of her house that have gone mossy. They’ve been filled before, but they clearly didn’t clean out all the moss. I’ve gotten some expert advice from my Dad on how to fix it properly, and I’m looking forward to it. Even though I’ll have to be up a ladder!

In my last post to try and get more clients (it’s a slow week at the moment), I offered to work an hour for free if someone can find a job a that I can’t figure out how to do. I’m going to do all I can to figure it out, of course, but if it’s beyond me and needs to be referred to a professional, I will happily work an hour for free. Especially if I can work alongside the tradesman that gets the job and learn a new skill. If I have do work of something else, that’s fine too. It will give me another opportunity to impress the client.

I also still have my ongoing referral offer. I hadn’t felt the need to mention it when my weeks were booked solid, but now I have empty slots AND a willing sidekick, I’m going to need to get more work. The referral offer, in case you’re interested, is ยฃ10 off your next job for every new client you help me find.

I’m considering trying to find some clients in Carmarthen also, however, those clients will have to pay a travel surcharge. It costs me ยฃ5.50 to get a return/day-tripper ticket from Kidwelly to Carmarthen. However, if I can get more than one Carmarthen client per day, I can split the cost between them. Building a client base in Carmarthen would allow me to potentially move to Carmarthen in future, at which point the travel expense will be removed or modified.

Remember the side-kick I mentioned? During a week when I was booked solid, and I was wondering how I would come with the workload should this trend continued, a lad contacted me and asked if I could use an extra pair of hands! It was great timing, however the trend did not continue. I expect work will pick up again, but there’s a cycle race coming through town this week, so everyone is busy with preparations for that and talking about it in the message boards. My posts are getting shoved down the page, unseen.

It did occur to me today that, in a town as small as Kidwelly, I may reach a maximum number of possible clients. Some people aren’t ever going to be interested, no matter how much marketing I do. Others will never be able to afford it. There may even be a few that weren’t happy with my work and will never call me again. So it makes sense to try and expand my client pool to include Carmarthen, and possibly Llanelli too. We’ll see.

A van would help me get around, and let me transport more materials and equipment.

I’m also considering creating a GoFundMe for a van, so I can work further afield and do jobs that will require the moving of materials, waste, and equipment/large tools. Crowdfunding would allow me to acquire the vehicle faster than saving up for it, and I doubt I’d be eligible for a loan, even if I wanted to take on a debt. Rewards would include ad-space on the van. The bigger the donation, the more space they’ll get. Starting with 1cm square. I just need to figure out which van I want, how much usable and visible surface area is on that van, divide the cost of the van by the number of 1cm squares there are available in the usable and visible surface area, and set up the campaign.

I might pitch the idea to various van dealers, or even the vehicle manufacturing companies, to see which of them wants to be involved and if there’s a particular van they want to promote. After the campaign is set up I could then approach both local businesses and large brands I like. Mountain Dew/ PepsiCo would definitely be on the list of big businesses I’d talk too! Perhaps a tool manufacturer like Bosch too. I’d also talk to the local builders merchant, Travis Perkins, and the other two big names in town, Gravells,ย and Burns.

I need to get my British driver’s license first. starting with a few driving lessons to get me used to driving in the UK. Perhaps the driving school will want to put their name on the side of my van too?

If you know of any businesses and people that might be interested in sponsoring my transition from foot-slogging my way to every job to driving to jobs in a nice new van, please let me know. Either by commenting on this blog post, emailing me, or messaging me via Facebook.

You can also contact me to ask me to do something for you, or just to chat. ๐Ÿ™‚

Have a great day! ๐Ÿ™‚