Tool Foolery

When you’re first starting out as an odd-jobber, you’re unlikely to have a lot of tools. Not unless you had some money put aside to invest in new business ventures. You’re going to have to build up your arsenal a little at as time, as and when you can afford it. The type of work your getting, and the problems you find keep coming up, will help you figure out what you need to buy at the time.

Having said that, if you can afford to invest a little money into buying tools before you start though, it will definitely help avoid embarrassment when a client’s tool breaks while you’re using it. Look after client tools as well as you can, but sometimes they just break.

It might be because it was a cheaply made tool only meant for light work, and the work that needs doing is too much for it, but sometimes your client won’t share this opinion, and just sees that you broke their stuff. If at all possible, avoid working for clients that jump straight to accusing you of deliberate misuse. Keep the clients that are more worried about whether or not you hurt yourself when the tool broke.

If at all possible, have the right tool for the job before you start. If the right tools aren’t available, or you’re not sure, it’s a good idea to manage the client’s expectations beforehand. “It looks like the ground is really hard. We could use the fork and spade, but it’ll take a while. A mattock would be better if you have one.” for example.

This also helps with under-promising and over-delivering. If you tell the client that it’s going to take a while, but then do the job well in less time than they expected, they’ll be a lot happier than if you say, “No problem. I’ll have it done in a jiffy”. Chances are, you’re going to come across some issues you didn’t anticipate. Don’t be afraid to undersell yourself, then allow your actions to speak louder than your words.

Back to tools. Chances are, when you’re first starting out you’ll have very few of your own tools. You may not know enough about DIY and Gardening to know whether or not the tools provided are going to be good enough. You’ll just have to take care, and be willing to learn.

Chances are, you’ll be working for people that used to be able to maintain their home and garden themselves. They have all the tools, and the knowhow, but their body is letting them down. Make sure they know that you’re new to this work, but you are willing clay, and let them teach you.

Sometimes the client may not know much themselves, having always relied on a late partner or other handy-folk. Luckily, you can make use of the internet to search for how-to guides and videos for nearly everything you’ll be asked to do. You can also ask friends and relatives that have done Gardening and DIY themselves, including me. I’ll be happy to help anyway I can.

Don’t beat yourself up for not knowing how to do everything already, or for not having all the tools necessary for every job. I started with only the experience I’d gained from helping my parents and having (briefly) been a homeowner myself. You’ll learn a lot, very quickly, and before you know it you’ll be able to make suggestions about how best to tackle the job.

Advertisements
Featured

More Odd-Jobbers Needed!

The blog is in a bit of a mess right now. It used to be my writing blog, where I talked about whatever was on my mind, kept my audience up to date with my work-in-progress, and (eventually) promoted my upcoming books. My writing career fell flat on it’s face when I realised it was a bad business model, and found myself doing odd jobs for money instead.

I then thought I could use the blog to showcase some of the work I’ve done for people, and perhaps increase my client base as a result. This turned out to be unnecessary as word spread quickly, and I found myself too busy to maintain the blog at all. There are still more people asking for help with simple little jobs. More than enough to go around, if you’d like to become an odd-jobber too. I’d be happy to help you do it too.

I don’t have a background in the trades. Both my father and my grandfather were tradesmen though, as well as a couple of my friends. I used to help my Dad with projects around the house, and did more for myself when I had a house of my own. My previous career falls mostly into the retail, customer service, and hospitality fields. I’ve also studied business and management, personal development and entrepreneurship.

I’ve toyed with the idea of starting a business of my own for some time, and had a few false starts along the way. When I moved to Kidwelly, joined the local noticeboard groups on Facebook, and saw how often the locals were asking for help with small jobs, I saw this as my opportunity. I didn’t know at the time it would be as successful as it’s become. I just thought it would give me some pocket money while I figured came up with something better.

I found the work enormously rewarding, and I doubt I could ever be happy in a ‘regular’ job again now. Many of my clients are elderly or have mobility problems, or both. They often used to do jobs like this themselves, but can’t anymore, and they appreciate having someone around to help. You’ll often learn a lot from these people. Others just don’t have the time, or the confidence, to do it themselves, and are thoroughly grateful for lightening their stressful workload.

At this point I often have people contacting me directly to have me do things for them, and there are still more on the Kidwelly community noticeboard groups. I want to help everyone, but I can’t do it alone. Having more people join the odd-job squad and take on the work that I can’t get to myself would be wonderful. Like I mentioned earlier, I’d be more than happy to help you establish yourself and be as successful as I am, by offering tips and advice through this blog, and even via messenger.

For example: One of the easiest ways to impress a new client, is simply by showing up on time, or even a few minutes early. It never hurts to give yourself extra time to find a new location. It’s important to make sure, when setting appointments, that you allow enough time to travel, and to relax a little before you go do another job. Some of them can be tiring and hard work.

Here’s another quick tip for you that ties into the first. Underpromise, and over-deliver. If you’re not sure how to do something, tell the client that you’ll give it a go, and you don’t have much experience, then get online and figure out how to do it. When the time comes, you’ll do a better job than the client expected, and they’ll be far more likely to recommend you to others. If you do it the other way around and talk yourself up to get the gig, but then clearly demonstrate that you’ve never done it before, don’t be surprised if you never hear from them again.

Related image

It’s okay to be a complete amateur when it comes to DIY and gardening. Most of the time the client knows exactly what they want doing, and even have most, if not all, of the tools you need to do it. They just need someone with a stronger back, younger muscles, and the time to do it. Sometimes all they need is a second pair of hands to hold something in place while they still do all the actual work.

You’ll quickly learn as you go. Particularly if you take the time to look stuff up online whenever you come across something you don’t know, or even ask the clients themselves how they would like it done. You’ll also find yourself getting fitter. If, like me, you were doing call-center work and waiting tables before you started odd-jobbing, you’ll find doing physical work for a couple of hours to be exhausting.

That’s why breaks are important. You’ll need to get something to drink, to eat, and to slow down for a spell before you go to the next job. Be kind to yourself. This job is going to be way better than working for a company. Pay yourself better than a regular job would, work fewer hours, keep your break times and days off as sacred as you can, and take care of yourself. Use sunblock if you’re outdoors, knee-pads if you have to kneel, and never turn down a drink.

I’m going to wrap this up for now, but there will be more posts like this coming. Feel free to ask me to elaborate on any of the points I’ve touched on, or ask me another question you might have about how to get started. You may even have a problem I’ve not had to deal with, and I’d still be happy to help you figure it out.

There are people out there that need your help with simple jobs, and they would be happy to pay you to help them. You can have the freedom to set your own hours, your own pay, and choose which clients you work with. Becoming Odd-Job Antony was the best decision I’ve ever made, and I suspect it will be for you too.

Good luck!

Business to Business

When I first moved to Kidwelly, I tried to get a job with one of the local businesses. One of these businesses even gave me a trial shift. I didn’t hear back from them, until yesterday. It’s been months, but I guess with Christmas around the corner they’re looking to hire some extra hands.

This reminded me of an idea I’d considered a while back. Offering my extensive experience to businesses as well as private individuals. My workload is full at the moment, but with winter coming, and gardening work becoming unnecessary, I expect I’ll be needing other kinds of work to maintain a steady income.

I’ve been doing painting jobs, assembling furniture, etc. which has been great, but projects like that end. Once the walls are painted, the new furniture assembled, the curtains hung, the carpet laid, the cracks filled, or whatever other work I’ve been asked to do is done, there’s nothing else to do but hope they find more work for me.

20181017_114756[1]

I’ve already begun making contacts among the local rental property owners and done some work for them. I’ve done handyman work for other local businesses too, gardening. I’d be more than happy to do more of the same, but it never hurts to have more to offer. I am, after all, a true jack of all trades. It would be a shame to leave some of my skills untapped.

So here’s my thinking. Local businesses can hire Odd-Job Antony, just like they might hire a plumber or an electrician, to do a job for them. This might be to cover for an absent employee, or to help with the Christmas rush, or even to do some handyman work. Either way they don’t have to employ me permanently, or even put me on the payroll. I’m a contractor, not an employee.

Here’s what I can do. Even before I got my first job in retail, I was raised to believe that a little good customer service can go a long way. I wanted to be even better, so I studied interpersonal skills, body language, and sales techniques. This served me well as I tried my hand at telesales as well as face-to-face sales positions, bar work, and even a supervisor role at a laser-tag arena.

I ended up back in retail again when I moved to America. I also got my first opportunity to work in a kitchen. It was just a McDonald’s, but it was a start. I got back into sales after that, and found I was good at over-the-phone debt collection. I only quit that job because I had to move. I found out I wasn’t so good at car sales. At least, not then. I’m a little curious if I could now with all I’ve learned since.

I started looking for other ways to make money. Particularly after I got a taste of management and corporate-ladder climbing. I started reading about self-improvement, leadership, entrepreneurship, and marketing. It got me a promotion to the marketing department of the communications company I was working for at the time. It gave me the opportunity to see how demographic data was used to increase sales, and even train people how to sell.

rsz_rafal_olechowski_istock_thinkstock_customer_service_0_1

I learned so much about business and management that I want to try starting my own business. I once spent a whole evening finding names and contact info for 200 people with the intention of inviting them to a tarot reading provided by my ex-wife, but she wasn’t comfortable with the idea of cold-calling strangers. In hindsight she was probably right, but it was kinda fun gathering all the information.

If you want I can tell you more about that little business venture, but it will have to be in person, or a least a private message. I started writing and blogging after that, inspired by the books I was reading. Hoping that the key to building wealth was writing. When I came back home to the UK I went back to working in bars and hotels. Until I moved to Kidwelly.

I found it hard to generate an income from writing and blogging, even using every social media marketing trick I learned. Local jobs were hard to come by, but I applied for every one that popped up. None of them panned out. I noticed though that lots of people were asking for help on the Kidwelly Noticeboard groups on Facebook. I realised there was a need that I could fill, and that’s why I started Odd-Job Antony.

To summarise. I’m a customer service and sales expert experienced in bar-work, retail, hospitality, entertainment, marketing, blogging and entrepreneurship, as well as being handy with a paintbrush, trowel, saw, hammer or screwdriver. In fact, if you can find something I can’t do, I’ll knock £10 off the next job. That’s a free hour doing anything you want. You could even use that hour to train me up if yo like. Want to try me?

Time to Commit

I think it’s time to take the stories down. I need to make this website all about the handyman work. The fiction distracts and detracts from the new direction I’ve taken. So, to that end, I’ll be taking it all down. From now on every page will be related to the Odd-Job business. I won’t take down the old blog posts, they show my journey if anyone is interested, but future blog posts will mostly be about how the business is doing.

It won’t all be business. Sometimes I just want to write about something that’s on my mind. I’ll try to avoid anything controversial, but hopefully these random musings will get people to know me better as a person. I’m a firm believer that people tend to work with people they like. You could be the most talented, experienced and professional handyman in the area, but if people don’t like you they won’t hire you again.

I don’t put on a show though. Part of the reason I prefer working for myself instead of any other job I’ve ever had, is that I can just be myself. I don’t need to conform to what some manager with no training thinks the customer wants. Don’t get me wrong, I’m very nice to people, but not because I’m being told to. I’m nice because I like to be nice. It feels good to smile. It feels even better to make others smile.

I won’t tell you I can do something if I don’t think I can or I’ve never tried. I will tell you up front if I have no access to the resources necessary for the job. If I haven’t done something before, but I have a good idea how to do it and I’d like to give it a shot, I’ll tell you that too. I prefer honesty to making promises I can’t deliver on. I do like doing new things though. It’s how I get more experienced, after all. Plus, it’s way more fun doing something new than doing the same boring old things all the time!

Things I really can’t do at the moment includes anything that involves driving anywhere or transporting stuff (I don’t have a van yet), going up to a second storey on a ladder (I really don’t want to die or be severely injured for £10 per hour), or raise an army of the dead (I could never find any decent necromancy classes). I’ll try my hand at almost anything else, but please bear in mind that I’m an enthusiastic and helpful amateur, and not a tradesman of any kind. Most of my experience before I started has been from helping out friends and family, and maintaining my own house and garden when I lived in the US.

I’ve been doing a lot of gardening for people, including mowing lawns, strimming, pruning, weeding, trimming, planting, and even burning the garden waste. That season is drawing to a close though. Luckily I’m also getting a lot more DIY jobs like hanging shelves and curtain rails, painting fences, sheds and staircases, building furniture (from flat pack and from scratch), disassembling furniture carefully for re-assembly elsewhere, and I’ve also helped clear out a junk room and walked dogs (though that’s not really DIY).

I’d love to get more jobs that involve making something. It could be anything from helping to make toys and clothing (did I mention I can sew?) to a new partition wall in your house. Anything I don’t know how to do, I can learn. If the client knows how something is done, and just needs an extra pair of hands to do it, I’ll be happy to learn from them. If not I can do the research and get back to them. I’ll show them what I plan to do, making certain it matches their vision and figuring out together what needs to be changed.

Since my overheads are low (I’m living with my parents rent free and I don’t have a vehicle to maintain), and I’m not a certified tradesman, I can keeps my rates low too, though I do appreciate it when a client feels that my work and my time is worth a bit more. One client that did so without any prompting from me said, ‘If I pay you a decent wage then you’ll keep coming back to me’. He’s absolutely right. If I have a scheduling conflict and I have to chose between client that only pays my base rate and him, I’m going to pick him!

It’s getting so I’m busy every week now, which is great. With luck and kindness, I’ll be able to start saving up for my own place, or a cheap vehicle, soon. It’s been slow going at the moment while I invest in more tools for the business, work clothes, bus travel (I have a client I visit twice a week that lives out of town), but I’m trying to cut back on these expenses so that I can begin making some real head way.

I’ll keep you up to date on my progress when I can. I’ve been so busy that writing this post has taken over a week to write! To be fair, it’s not just the Odd-Job business. I’ve also got a Games & Geekery club started in Kidwelly that’s branched into Family Games Day and a Warhammer group too, plus there’s my personal life. I won’t talk about that here though. Local geeks and gamers are welcome to join the Facebook Group. I also have a WordPress site for anyone to enjoy.

If you want to know the more personal stuff, you’ll have to know me better 😉

I’d best wrap this up and get this out, or it’ll be another week before I do. Before I go though, I have a few easy questions. Just to see if you’ve been paying attention.

  1. What’s my basic hourly rate for any odd-job work?
  2. What did I think I could make a career out of before I started Odd-Jobbing?
  3. What else have I been up to in the community that’s been keeping me busy?
  4. Why are my rates so low?

Can you find all the answers? (Hint: they’re in bold!)

Thanks for following, and have a great day! 🙂

 

What Happened to the Website?

I changed it! Do you like it? Don’t worry, I’m still going to write (in fact I may actually write more frequently), I’ll just be doing it for fun, instead of trying to make a living at it. My main source of income (for now) is performing random tasks, odd-jobs, chores, and bits and bobs!

Most of what I’m doing is gardening. Mowing lawns, ripping up weeds, pruning, strimming, hedge-trimming, planting, etc. Occasionally I get to assemble and hang shelving units, curtains rails and pictures, or to clean up and repaint garden furniture or a fence. I’ve also poured concrete, cleared gutters, shovelled gravel and even helped people to access their emails more easily.

I’m looking forward to some bigger challenges. I have one client that would like to extend their decking. Another has an old wood-frame greenhouse they would like to have repaired (removing the rotten wood and splicing in new, fresh timbers). One of my newer clients has some cracks on the outside of her house that have gone mossy. They’ve been filled before, but they clearly didn’t clean out all the moss. I’ve gotten some expert advice from my Dad on how to fix it properly, and I’m looking forward to it. Even though I’ll have to be up a ladder!

In my last post to try and get more clients (it’s a slow week at the moment), I offered to work an hour for free if someone can find a job a that I can’t figure out how to do. I’m going to do all I can to figure it out, of course, but if it’s beyond me and needs to be referred to a professional, I will happily work an hour for free. Especially if I can work alongside the tradesman that gets the job and learn a new skill. If I have do work of something else, that’s fine too. It will give me another opportunity to impress the client.

I also still have my ongoing referral offer. I hadn’t felt the need to mention it when my weeks were booked solid, but now I have empty slots AND a willing sidekick, I’m going to need to get more work. The referral offer, in case you’re interested, is £10 off your next job for every new client you help me find.

I’m considering trying to find some clients in Carmarthen also, however, those clients will have to pay a travel surcharge. It costs me £5.50 to get a return/day-tripper ticket from Kidwelly to Carmarthen. However, if I can get more than one Carmarthen client per day, I can split the cost between them. Building a client base in Carmarthen would allow me to potentially move to Carmarthen in future, at which point the travel expense will be removed or modified.

Remember the side-kick I mentioned? During a week when I was booked solid, and I was wondering how I would come with the workload should this trend continued, a lad contacted me and asked if I could use an extra pair of hands! It was great timing, however the trend did not continue. I expect work will pick up again, but there’s a cycle race coming through town this week, so everyone is busy with preparations for that and talking about it in the message boards. My posts are getting shoved down the page, unseen.

It did occur to me today that, in a town as small as Kidwelly, I may reach a maximum number of possible clients. Some people aren’t ever going to be interested, no matter how much marketing I do. Others will never be able to afford it. There may even be a few that weren’t happy with my work and will never call me again. So it makes sense to try and expand my client pool to include Carmarthen, and possibly Llanelli too. We’ll see.

A van would help me get around, and let me transport more materials and equipment.

I’m also considering creating a GoFundMe for a van, so I can work further afield and do jobs that will require the moving of materials, waste, and equipment/large tools. Crowdfunding would allow me to acquire the vehicle faster than saving up for it, and I doubt I’d be eligible for a loan, even if I wanted to take on a debt. Rewards would include ad-space on the van. The bigger the donation, the more space they’ll get. Starting with 1cm square. I just need to figure out which van I want, how much usable and visible surface area is on that van, divide the cost of the van by the number of 1cm squares there are available in the usable and visible surface area, and set up the campaign.

I might pitch the idea to various van dealers, or even the vehicle manufacturing companies, to see which of them wants to be involved and if there’s a particular van they want to promote. After the campaign is set up I could then approach both local businesses and large brands I like. Mountain Dew/ PepsiCo would definitely be on the list of big businesses I’d talk too! Perhaps a tool manufacturer like Bosch too. I’d also talk to the local builders merchant, Travis Perkins, and the other two big names in town, Gravells, and Burns.

I need to get my British driver’s license first. starting with a few driving lessons to get me used to driving in the UK. Perhaps the driving school will want to put their name on the side of my van too?

If you know of any businesses and people that might be interested in sponsoring my transition from foot-slogging my way to every job to driving to jobs in a nice new van, please let me know. Either by commenting on this blog post, emailing me, or messaging me via Facebook.

You can also contact me to ask me to do something for you, or just to chat. 🙂

Have a great day! 🙂

 

 

 

Erm…What?

Sadly, my first gig as Odd-Job Antony hasn’t happened yet. They weren’t feeling well, but they’ve assured me that they will call me when the snow clears and they feel well enough to continue.

I was hoping that the snow itself would encourage people to call me to shovel snow away for them, but no such luck. I did get to help clear the street this morning though, and in doing so met a neighbour that has a few rental properties. She now knows that I’m available, and that I have a page of Facebook. Hopefully, I’ll be hearing from her soon.

I’m going to post more flyers this coming week and check that the flyers I have up have been effective. Basically, I’m going to see if people have been taking the tear-offs. If so, then it’s worth replacing those flyers when the tear-offs are gone. If not, I need to focus on other locations.

I’m concerned that if the flyers are everywhere, people won’t see them anymore, especially if they don’t change. I’ll use the same flyers I’ve already designed this time around and put them in more locations. but when the time comes to replace them, I’ll make them a little different. Probably not much, just enough for people to notice them again.

I had a much clearer victory with my writing. There was a chap on Facebook asking for writers to help with a project. Most of the time many other writers have already responded to such requests, but I asked for more details anyway. You can’t score of you don’t kick the ball. You might not, but you definitely won’t if you don’t try. I ended up having a conversation that got me a writing gig through UpWork.com!

I’ve tried a few times to create a profile for UpWork.com because it’s the go to site for finding freelancers. Every time I’ve been told that my profile has been rejected because there are too many other writers offering the same skills. The client sent me an invite to the site as on outside writer, and managed to bypass this so that I could accept the contract. Which is awesome.

However, it seems that my profile is still being rejected. I’m going to tweak it a little and try to make it stand out a little more. I’m curious to see if the link actually does anything. What do you see when you visit my UpWork profile? You can comment below or message me via Facebook to tell me what you see and offer suggestions. This conundrum has inspired the title of this article!

I’ve also created a Fiverr.com gig, but that hasn’t had any traction yet. I may need to tweak it some more. Fiverr works a little differently from UpWork. On UpWork.com you create a profile and search through available jobs. Clients then decide whether or not to grant you the contract based on your profile. On Fiverr, you tell people what you want to do as a gig and potential clients search through the available gigs to hire you. It requires the client to do the legwork.

I’d like to build a strong enough client base to make £800 per month. That would allow me to rent the flat I’m after (thankfully the landlady has granted me another month to generate a stable income before she gives it to someone else), and have enough for groceries, savings, reinvesting in marketing, and the occasional treat. Ideally I’d blow that goal out of the water and be able to help my sister find her own place and fatten my parent’s retirement fund, but we’ll start small and work up to that!

In addition to trying to get odd-jobs and writing gigs, I’m still looking for part-time work in the nearby cities. This would still give me time to pursue my entrepreneurial endeavours, and also get me halfway to my goal. If I don’t reach my goal by the deadline, it’s not the end of the world. My parents have assured me I can stay with them for as long as I have to. I will, of course, be offering them my odd-jobs services for free in exchange for their kindness, but I’d like to do more.

If you happen to know anyone that needs any writing done, please have them visit my Fiverr or UpWork (if it works) pages and give me a shot. The more I can do to build my portfolio, the easier it’ll get to find work. I also have a Paypal account if you’d rather pay me for work directly instead of going through the freelancer sites. I don’t want charity. I want to earn it.

If you don’t have any work for me, you can support me by buying my short stories and leaving reviews. ‘The Haunted Story‘ is going to become a series, and you can buy the short story that inspired it for just .99c (about 75p I think). I also have a story called ‘Murder Inc.’ published in an anthology called Ubiquicity, which is available as a paperback or ebook. Let me know if you want to get a signed copy.

I didn’t intend for this article to become a sales pitch, but it kinda did. I know some people will think less of me for wanting to get paid for helping people or writing my stories. Art shouldn’t be about making money, and helping people should be something you do just to be nice. I would be happy to do both those things if I manage to generate enough passive income to never need to work for money.

This is actually an avenue I’m looking into. Earlier today I was watching a video pitch for a business that suggested I could make thousands of US dollars every day for just 30 minutes work, but then you get to the end of the pitch and find out that the reason why the guy is making this much money is because he’s charging you to use his system. I suspect that you’re then supposed to sucker other chumps into the scheme in order to earn your commission through affiliate marketing.

Maybe I should have tried it. Maybe it would actually work. However, I’d still rather be writing and/or doing odd-jobs for a living than by luring people into the same scam I’ve got myself suckered into. The search for a way to monetise my blog without compromising my brand, or my integrity continues.

Have a great day 🙂

 

 

Odd-Job Antony!

 

I have put the idea I had while writing ‘The Hunt Continues‘ into effect! I am now an odd-job man!

My first gig starts on Tuesday (unless another client asks me to work in Monday)! They’ve asked me to clean their sunroof, dig up some bushes, bag up the mulch on their flower bed, straighten up a leaning clothes-line pole and paint the bathroom. I won’t be able to get it all done in one day, and that’s fine by me. I’m really looking forward to it.

One of the things that seems to be missing from modern employment is a feeling of having actually accomplished something. Some jobs may have certain metrics you’re expected to reach, and if you do you’re expected to keep going. The job isn’t ever ‘done’. You don’t get to sit back and admire your handiwork. When you get up tomorrow, there will be more of the same repetitive work to do.

As an odd-jobber, I’ll be able to see my progress, check each job off as it’s completed, and then do something else! It’ll will also feel better to be doing something physical. We all know the health benefits of exercise, but it always seems so boring and purposeless. This way I’ll be walking to the client’s home and doing physical activity of some kind with a clearly defined objective.

Accomplishing things feels good. Helping people feels good. I may not make a ton of money, but that’s not what this is about. It’s about being the best me I can be and feeling good about myself. I also like writing, but I have a feeling that I’ll feel more motivated, energised and happy if I’m also doing something physical, helpful and productive.

If I can make enough to get by with odd-jobs, and possibly a local part-time job (if I can find one I like) to keep a roof over my head and pay for groceries, then everything I make from writing can be reinvested into marketing my books, improving my website, and investing in myself to become an even better writer. By the time I’m too old to work odd-jobs anymore, it is my hope that the passive income from royalties I will fund my retirement.

What I actually want is to start my own publishing business, but I’ll start with my own place and full belly and see how it goes from there! One of the ways that I might be able to generate additional income is by posting ads on this website, or by participating in affiliate marketing (in which case I’d be actively promoting certain products an services in an attempt to earn commission). I’d rather not to that.

I’d also rather not crowdfund. I’ve tried it before, but my heart wasn’t in it. Partly because I feel like I need to offer something tangible to feel like I’ve earned the money. Doing odd-jobs to raise the money I need to get by feels right. I’ve tried offering writing services too, and I’m still willing to do that, but it’s a very hard market to break into, with a lot of competition.

I’ve also seen websites earn income by offering ‘products’. Usually these take the form of a slick video course, a pdf format e-book, or a package that combines the two. Something like that may be interesting, though I’m thinking my ‘products’, if I ever do such a thing would probably be campaigns for role-play games like D&D, Pathfinder, ShadowRun, or even the upcoming UbiquiCity roleplay system. Perhaps. We’ll see.

One step at a time. I’m just excited. One thing I may do is set up a separate website just for the odd-jobs business. That might include ads and product reviews (ie. affiliate marketing) that would fit the home, gardening, decorating and DIY theme. I’ve already set up a Facebook page for Odd-Job Antony. It would help to have a website associated with it.

I’m going to look into that idea a little, and also research what I should be charging. The clients I’ll be working for on Tuesday asked me what the ‘going rate’ was for odd-jobs, and I realised I have absolutely no idea, so I’m going to research that a little too. I had been thinking that people can pay me (or barter with me) for whatever they think the work is worth, and what they can afford. It would help to have a basic idea of what others charge though.

I’d best get on with it. Have a great day 🙂